Homework most days will be a quickwrite. A prompt will be on the board. Students must write a page in their writer's notebooks (WNs). At least half the page must be in response to the prompt; the other half can be whatever they like (so long as they keep it school-appropriate). I connect most quickwrite prompts to the literature we're currently studying. Students who write a full page on the prompt get 10% extra credit. Students who write a full page on the prompt giving examples from the literature we're currently studying get double-credit for the assignment. General prompts do not qualify for the double-credit option. Friday's prompt is usually a freewrite.

QUICKWRITE PROMPTS - General

Do not copy out the prompt. Write out the title and the date at the top of the page. For full credit, at least 1/2 page must be in response to the prompt. The other half may be a freewrite. Responses that stay on topic for the full page will receive extra credit.
  • What is literature?
  • What does it mean to analyze something?
  • What are your goals for this class? Why are those goals important to you?
  • Is it important for you to go to college? Why/why not?
  • Describe a "fun" activity for Eng 2. BUT for credit, explain how/why it will make students better readers and/or writers.
  • Describe your fall/winter/spring break.
  • Reflect on the semester. What have you learned? What activities were most helpful, and why? Least helpful, why? What did you do well? What could you have done differently to help you learn more? What could the teacher have done to help you learn more?
  • First experiences are often memorable. Describe a first experience that was important and why it mattered.
  • What skills should students be expected to master in their English classes? What makes those skills important? Are there any skills that are sort of important but do not require mastery? Why or why not? (originally on a Wednesday)
  • Look at your list of skills from yesterday. What can students DO to prove they have learned them? (originally on a Thursday)
  • Look at the skills from [Wednesday] and the way that students will prove them from [Thursday]. Based on that, what activities should students do in class to learn those skills?

The following prompts are from Nancie Atwell.
  • What are my earliest memories? How far back can I remember?
  • What are the most important things that have happened to me in my life so far?
  • What have I seen that I can't forget?
  • What's an incident that shows what my family and I are like?
  • What's an incident that shows what my friends and I are like?
  • What's an incident that shows what my pet(S) and I are like?
  • What's something that happened to me at school that I'll always remember?
  • What's something that happened to me at home that I'll always remember?
  • What's an incident that changed how I think or feel about something?
  • What's an incident that changed my life?
  • What's a time or place that I was perfectly happy?
  • What's a time or place that I laughed a lot?
  • What's a time or place when it felt as if my heart was breaking?
  • What's a time with a parent that I'll never forget?
  • What's a time with a grandparent that I'll never forget?
  • What's a time with a brother or sister that I'll never forget?
  • What's a time with a cousin or another relative that I'll never forget?
  • What's a time with a friend that I'll never forget?
  • Can I remember a time when I learned to do something, or did something for the first time?
  • What memories emerge when I make a timeline of my life so far and note the most important things that happened to me each year?
  • What problem needs solving?
  • What issue needs explaining?
  • What idea needs exploring?
  • What choice I've made / stand I've taken / personal preference of mine needs to be understood by others?
  • What area of my expertise needs sharing?

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